‘Art tends to evolve faster under constraints.’

Sam Valenti from record label Ghostly International explains how musicians are adapting to the new economy.

‘Art tends to evolve faster under constraints.’

‘Art tends to evolve faster under constraints.’

‘I think the intimacy and personality that has come through for certain artists, the way that companies have become more comfortable using video conferencing, some have enjoyed it. I don't think it will ever replicate live, but I think with the exposition of process, a lot of artists are just saying, “Hey, I'm going to be making music on Twitch, come watch,” or, “I'm going to be playing a video game, come hang out.” So it’s a virtual hang, which sites like Turntable FM really had right as far as the idea that music's a communal thing people like to hang around with.

‘Both for fans and artists, there is a need that has been shown for a virtual hang. So whether it's educational or just watching a DJ play songs – or, in the case of Ghostly Knowledge Share, to have our professionals share their work with up-and-coming artists – the desire to connect alone or together is not going anywhere. 

‘I think art tends to evolve faster under constraints, be they financial or otherwise, and we’ve watched a lot of artists we work with make leaps, like they never would have done a livestream before, but their version of it is like, “Well, I set up a camera in my backyard and I'm going to play tracks and just let people kind of comment and hang out.” I think that's something that, without this constraint, never would have come up.

‘It's not gonna look like a seismic leap, but it's gonna be a lot of small things that add up. I think the comfort for a lot of artists with the technology and not looking at it as sort of self promotion or being shameless, instead using it as a tool to connect, is a positive. There's less of a fear around going live. But, ultimately, artists want to portray themselves or connect in a way that's meaningful. So I think there's gonna be some really cool stories that come out of this era.’

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