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Peanut Butter on Toast: Curtis Sittenfeld and Fanny Singer

Curtis and Fanny talk cooking, adjusting expectations, and the extraordinary lives of Hillary Rodham Clinton and Alice Waters.

Hillary Clinton and Alice Waters are two women who do not need an introduction. But Curtis Sittenfeld and Fanny Singer write about these well-known public figures from a new perspective. We hoped that by pairing them, we would get to eavesdrop on a delightful conversation about the worlds of politics and food, gain insights into the process of two meticulous writers, and hear about any trepidations they felt in telling stories about powerful women… and wow, did these two deliver!

-Aminatou & Ann

Author

Curtis Sittenfeld

Curtis Sittenfeld is the bestselling author of six novels, including Prep, American Wife, Eligible, and Rodham. Her short story collection, You Think It, I’ll Say It, was a 2018 Reese Witherspoon / Hello Sunshine Book Club pick. Her books have been selected by The New York Times, Time, Entertainment Weekly, and People for their “Ten Best Books of the Year” lists, optioned for television and film, and translated into thirty languages.

Author

Fanny Singer

Fanny Singer is a writer, editor, and co-founder of the design brand, Permanent Collection. In 2013, she received a Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge. In 2015, she and her mother, Alice Waters, published My Pantry which she also illustrated. She travels widely, contributing to a number of publications including Frieze, The Wall Street Journal Magazine, Apartamento, T Magazine, and Art Papers, among others.

  • Hillary Clinton and Alice Waters are two women who do not need an introduction. But Curtis Sittenfeld and Fanny Singer write about these well-known public figures from a new perspective. We hoped that by pairing them, we would get to eavesdrop on a delightful conversation about the worlds of politics and food, gain insights into the process of two meticulous writers, and hear about any trepidations they felt in telling stories about powerful women… and wow, did these two deliver! 

    June 22, 2020

    -Aminatou & Ann

    Curtis

    Hi, Fanny.

    Fanny

    Hi, Curtis. It's so nice to be talking to you today.

    Curtis

    It's so nice to be talking to you. You’re in Northern California?

    Fanny

    Yeah, I've been in Berkeley for close to 4 months now sheltering in place at my mom's house—the house I grew up in. Otherwise, I’m based in San Francisco, although it feels like a remote memory now. 

    Curtis

    Do you remember the first day that you started sheltering? I feel like people have this very clear memory. 

    Fanny

    Oh, yeah. There was a lot of trepidation about coming to my mom's place. She is in her mid-70s. I was apprehensive about somehow infecting her. I was contending with an obstinate boomer’s notion of what handwashing was. It was right when my book was about to be published, which was at the end of March. We were completely pivoting in terms of what we were going to do for events. 

    Curtis

    What was your official publication date?

    Fanny

    It was the 31st of March.  

    Curtis

    So did you have a tour plan that was either canceled or shifted to virtual?

    Fanny

    Oh, fully. There was a multi-city, multi-country tour that got completely, entirely changed to digital. Even the earliest events were already well into when most people were sheltering in place. Conveniently, the book is called Always Home. So, there was an uncanny prescience around that title that I think did not do the book a disservice.  

    Curtis

    Have you had people say that the title seems really appropriate? 

    Fanny

    Totally. Probably the majority of the posts on Instagram, especially when first starting to read it, would be like “what a crazy title.” My boyfriend and my joke became, “maybe you're a prophet. What if you had called your book Everyone Is Employed Now and There Is No Pandemic?”

    [Laughter]

    I really should have done that. When did Rodham come out?  

    Curtis

    It came out May 19th. I feel like a book coming during the pandemic is like a tree falling in a forest. No one is there… The truth is, sometimes a book publication date doesn't really feel super different unless you make it feel super different. Sometimes I have been in New York or done an event that day or the night before, but the times that I have been home on publication days, it does feel sort of like, “I guess I’ll do some laundry.” 

    But I do feel like this publication has been incredibly weird. We would not know if I should attribute certain factors, like a very high proportion of people who finished the book crying, to whether it was because of the book or because they are reading in the pandemic. It is really hard to say. So, did you do something for your actual publication day? 

    Fanny

    Well, you know, it's a book about my mom. It also deals with my relationship with Chez Panisse, so the idea was to have a nice meal at the restaurant. So we were planning it, then as we were getting closer and closer, I was like, “Um, shit, the restaurant is going to be closed.” So, we obviously did not have a dinner. 

    I did stand on my—it's not really a balcony but there is an iron gate where the doors open into the garden where I had friends come over, all standing 20 feet from one another, wearing masks. No one really quite knew, even at the end of March, how serious this thing was. People were being prudent, but also still willing to congregate in limited numbers. I read a chapter to them. Then, I was like, “…and good night.”

    [Laughter]

    Curtis

    I know you wrote a book with your mom. Do you consider this to be your first book or not your first book?   

    Fanny

    I consider this my first book. The thing that we wrote together, it was a book kind of taken from recipes that had meant to be in a previous book and then there was not space or quite coherence to have a pantry chapter. Those went into a separate little book called My Pantry. My mom asked me to come on board, mainly because she needed a new collaborator for that project and I was also illustrating it. I helped her with the writing as well. She usually works and collaborates with writers. That was really kind of her vision for what it was going to be. It wasn't necessarily “how I cook” or conceived with a narrative around food. This really feels like the first effort.  

    Curtis

    Something I'm always curious about when I talk to other writers: If somebody says, “oh, what's your book about?” How do you describe it?

    Fanny

    That's a great question for anyone. This is a true Frankensteinian kind of book. It's got photography by Brigitte Lacombe who is a wonderful photographer. Not to express too much narcissism, but you could pick it up just for the pictures—she’s that caliber of photographer. It also is really a cookbook. A lot of people are buying it primarily for the recipes. My editor was open to me writing a real narrative, nonfiction book as well, so that ended up being the most important part of it for me—that the stories drove it. Then, of course, the recipes felt like such an essential anchor; they ground the stories in something concrete, in something you could taste. 

    Curtis

    Do you feel like the recipes, or the essays came first? Or did they come at the same time?

    Fanny

    A little bit of both. The recipes are foundational recipes from my childhood and for my mom, too. Some are defining recipes that explain her palette or her approach to cooking. Some are tethered to a funny story—like the Lobster Salad recipe, which is a story that happens to have a hint of a recipe attached. It was an absurd story about being a 9-year-old in France, horribly carsick the entire way between one town and another on our way to lunch. And then as soon as I barfed up everything I had eaten in the morning, I’m given the opportunity to order whatever I want at this very fancy restaurant, and I ordered Lobster Salad. You know, absolutely guileless—no sense of the inappropriateness of that request. It was one of the best things I'd ever eaten in my short life. 

    Anyways, I love that we were put together as a pair, with our quasi nonfiction, quasi fiction. On the surface my book is nonfiction but also it's a portrait of my mother from my perspective. The way that you went from an actual story that we knew or read about and then explored this whole fictional, potential world. I was like, “I wish it had been.” I could hear Hillary's voice. The clarity of it, the pragmatism of it. It still felt like there was no breach between the realm of nonfiction at the beginning and where it went. I wondered how you actually managed to create such an uninterrupted texture to the narrative?  

    Curtis

    Thank you. I have written a little nonfiction over the years but I am primarily a fiction writer. At one point, I had this conversation with a producer for a narrative podcast. He was asking if I would want to create a podcast that would involve all of this nonfiction research and even though I was intrigued and thought he was very smart, I couldn't imagine doing all this research and using it in a straightforward way instead of using it for fiction. There are a lot of fiction writers who do research. In terms of trying to find or mimic Hillary's voice, one thing I did was listen to a campaign podcast. Did you ever hear any of it?

    Fanny

    I didn't listen to it, but I know of its existence.  

    Curtis

    I didn't know it existed at the time it was airing. It was created by her campaign. She was very relaxed. It was clearly this friendly conversation. I think it made her sound different and it made me hear her differently. I tried to write in a straightforward way and if the opportunity arose to use a Hillary-ish word, I’d do that. Instead of having my guiding principle to be channeling Hillary, then I think every sentence would have been so hard to write. 

    By the way, I was poking around online and saw a description of you. I think this was the San Francisco Chronicle that described you as the “Chelsea Clinton of the Bay Area food world.” How do you feel about that description?

    Fanny

    I knew you were going to say that when you started that anecdote. I think people are prone to creating those kinds of analogies because there are so few women in power at the level that my mother is in her field and Hillary is in hers. If there is a single daughter of one of these women—I can hardly draw another relevant cultural example. I did actually send a book to Chelsea, who I know very slightly—one of my dear friends was her college roommate. I inscribed it “From one daughter of an extraordinary mother to another.” There is a sense of sorority, I think, in that relationship that we have that is extremely unique and that’s been largely lived out in a very public way.  

    Curtis

    Did you hear back by the way?

    Fanny

    No, but It was shortly before the revolution, and so many other mitigating factors, so I sent it into the void knowing I might not ever hear. Which is totally fine.  

    Curtis

    I sent something to my sister, who is not the daughter of a president, but everything that is sent out we send into the void. Actually, one thing I'm curious about is the proximity to fame in my writing—the bystanders to a famous person. They didn't choose it, but some of the public attention falls on them. How shaped by that do you feel, and in most situations in your life, do you feel like people think of you as the daughter of Alice Waters? 

    Fanny

    I'm rarely recognized. Whereas, my mom will get, in certain places like Japan, sort of inexplicably mobbed in the open, in ways that she will not in the States. A while ago, she did a Japanese cooking show that became a very followed and subscribed to thing in Japan. I tried to address it in the preface. Her celebrity is of a weird variety. People really know her if they are food people or environmental activist food people. Otherwise, it's limited. Actually, I went to England for 11 years. That was the emancipation period where, even in restaurants, my name meant nothing. So it really did feel like I could be autonomous. I’ve often said that, I feel like Alice Waters’ daughter is my epithet. That’s how I get introduced: “Alice Waters’ daughter, comma, Fanny.” In a way, the book was an attempt to deal with that head-on. It was like okay, this is a relationship people are curious about. How can I write about it? There is not a particular tale to tell—you know, there is not that kind of content about the relationship that would make it salacious or spicy. At the same time, how can I be honest about the relationship and as transparent as such a book would permit? Here I am, you know, living in our house in this unemancipated way at the moment.

    Curtis

    Do you feel like you are living inside your own book or one of your own essays?  

    Fanny

    To some extent, yeah. It has been funny to think about some of the particularities that I described.

    I wanted to ask you about something that I think our projects really diagnose and deal with—this idea of female stereotypes. Certain things exist—there is an archetype around powerful women especially. But also, how can we nuance that and humanize those things? That was something that I really loved about Rodham—I felt a kind of texture to what we know about Hillary in the public persona. Obviously those are things that you're embroidering and half inventing.  

    Curtis

    It felt like in your book it’s a lovely, authentic thing, and in mine it’s a total fabrication.

    I think that sometimes people feel like famous people only exist when they are in public. A politician exists only when they're giving a speech, not when they’re washing their face before bed or eating cereal in the morning.

  • Candles
    "There is something sort of strange and compelling about showing a famous person doing ordinary, unremarkable things."
    Curtis Sittenfeld
  • Curtis

    Not pretending, but actually doing the real things.

    Fanny

    I love the details of the nest. How Hillary would retreat to her highly domestic, intimate space and then have a moment to digest the day. What stuck with me is this idea of peanut butter on toast. I’m the daughter of a cook but if left to my own devices, I will have peanut butter on toast when I’m alone and need to eat something quickly. These behaviors felt really authentic. 

    Curtis

    Actually, one of the details that I really liked in your book is when your mother eats small portions. When you were playing soccer in high school, after she went to bed you would eat a bowl of cereal or some pasta. And the description in the book of the two of you taking this road trip at camping sites, making food in this way that I have never heard of...

    [Laughter]

    I mean, I’ve heard of packing a sandwich instead of stopping at McDonald's, but having a cooler full of produce... In some ways, it is much more interesting than having a big public celebration or having a famous person eating at the restaurant. Especially in the current age of social media, we often suspect each other of being fake. There is this glimpse, even if it is, in my case, pretend: this is how the person acts when really no one or almost no one is watching. It feels like, by definition, you can't really know what people’s little private habits are except for yourself or the people that you live with or somebody that you know super well. 

    Fanny

    I think that one of the things that is unusual about my mom, and I suspect is different from politicians in general, is that she does a fair amount of stuff in front of the camera but she is remarkably consistent in terms of how she is off-camera. There is a certain quality of experience in life that is a baseline for her. She is unwilling to dip below. So it is unfathomable to imagine that she would go into a Subway driving across the country. She would've provisioned for us or for her to have something decent on the road. Even as her child, there was a certain amount of rigor and commitment that that requires. It is genuinely not performative. That's what is distinguishing in terms of the ways that she exists online, and now increasingly on social media. She loves Instagram—there is not a gap between what is presented and what is real. I certainly tried to convey that in the book because there was a kind of quality of existence that had nothing to do with material wealth or whatever. It had to do with certain standards.  

    Curtis

    Has the way that you have been eating, either you or the two of you, during quarantine changed?  

    Fanny

    Yeah, I talk often and repeatedly about what a bad baker I am. That has changed. I can turn out a pretty decent cake. I figured out a few recipes that I can reliably turn out. This morning, I told my mom, we have to cut it with the cake. This is not sustainable. I need to stop with the baking. 

    How have you been faring? Do you cook?

    Curtis

    (Laughing) The truth is I do 100% of the grocery shopping. My husband does 100% of the cooking. We have two kids, 9 and 11. When our second child was born, I usually cooked dinner. I was an okay to bad cook. I said I was too tired—and told my husband, you need to cook and you need to wash the dishes, and now that child is 9 and he is still cooking and washing the dishes. 

    I'm also one of those people where I do almost nothing creative besides writing. Speaking of feminist issues—when my kids were younger, sometimes people would say, how do you have two kids and write? Which in itself is a sexist question. I don’t think any man has ever been asked how they write and have young kids. But, the answer is partly because there is a ton of stuff that I don't do. Even if I went to someone's house for dinner, if I said I would bring dessert probably my husband—actually one of my kids likes cooking—would cook something. I think that people—especially a lot of women of themselves—are very critical. Like, I have to do things in eight categories sort of well. 

    Fanny

    On that subject, I wondered about your decision to make Hillary never have kids.  

    Curtis

    Because I was deviating from the historical timeline, I felt like reality and my fiction had to echo each other. If I had said, she doesn't marry Bill but she marries Fred Smith and they live in the suburbs of Milwaukee and have three kids and she is a very successful lawyer, at some point, it is not a book about Hillary. It is a book about any woman who graduated from college in the late 60s. So, there were certain plot choices I made because of how they contrasted with her life more. Because if Hillary hadn’t married Bill, I think she would have remarried. If she did not go into politics in the book, why write the book?

    I have a question for you. Do you know who Carmen Maria Machado is? She wrote a story collection called Her Body and Other Parties, and she just wrote this memoir called In the Dream House. I interviewed her back when we used to leave our houses. Her memoir of, essentially, a verbally abusive relationship, is a gripping read and really well done. I asked why was this the book that she chose to write, especially following a story collection. And she said she had to write it. That it was stuck inside her, and also in order to access other things. 

    I have a two-part question. One, do you feel that this is the book that you had to write to, potentially, address the question of your mother and your mother's identity? Two, is there a book that you have been freed to write by writing this?

    Fanny

    I think I only just realized the extent to which this is a necessary book for me, not just the book that there is an audience for. Because that is partially it—there is a certain curiosity about my mom and definitely a familiarity as a public persona. I knew that there would be an appetite. But then, as I was getting into it and writing it, there was a sense that this is an oxygenation of the relationship from my perspective. I needed to write it in order to shrug it off a little bit. It's an enormous part of my life and I think my relationship to my mother is unusually dense. Even coming off of my writing, I think, did I actually do it?   

    Curtis

    I think you did it. I don't know your mom, but I think you did it. Do you know what your next dream book is going to be to write? Food-related, completely different?  

    Fanny

    I don’t know. I would say in this moment in time, it's really recalibrated a lot. What I do professionally is write about culture and art and art criticism. It's usually short form pieces and obviously I haven't had a commission for one of those in a bit. I forget what a museum is. A lot of things that were trappings of my former professional life have been dismantled by first the pandemic, and then the major questions culturally, of where is our focus best placed?

    In a way, it is like reading Rodham, it felt like she was getting into some of those questions about what we really need.  

    Curtis

    Are you going to run for office?

    Fanny

    My friend and I were Googling which law schools take the students with the lowest LSAT scores. When you get down to it, the only thing I can do to be useful is be a lawyer. Then, you’re like, “Ok, that is still beyond my ken. I don't have the tools for that.” 

    Curtis

    In doing research, if I decided to run for office—which I never would do—I would know exactly how to do it. I would know how to smile.

    Fanny

    I saw this meme the other day. It was a picture of Darth Vader in the surf. He is pouring water from a Brita into a jug of water. It was like, “When you don't know what you are doing in your life anymore.” Such a weird image and so strangely resonant for right now. I was, in a way, lucky the book came out when it did. It seems absurd to say that I think that I’m lucky that my book came out in the pandemic, but it came out in the gentle beginnings of the pandemic when the title of my book was resonant, people were cooking at home, it was a cozy story. By the time we got to the last few weeks, even though my UK edition came out in June, there was no way I could talk about it on social media. There are things that are so much more pressing. You must have really felt it in Minneapolis, too.  

    Curtis

    Yeah, I mean I cancelled my virtual event. I guess it was actually the week after George Floyd’s killing and protesters were being shot at with tear gas. I could not sit in my house smelling the smoke and be like, “Well, I decided to write Rodham because I knew that in the 70s Hillary had turned down Bill's proposals twice.” 

    It has been a surreal time to publish. This seems very true for both of us.

  • Candles
    "You never know what the life of the book will be."
    Curtis Sittenfeld
  • Curtis

    As we wrap up, for people reading, do you have recommendations from your book for both a talented cook, and a very unskilled cook?

    Fanny

    I will start with unskilled. Nailing a good garlicky vinaigrette is a key cornerstone thing. Making a good green salad and vinaigrette. I’m amazed how my friends who love to cook, when they first had a salad with this style of vinaigrette—which is not something I invented—people say, “what did you do to this?” It is just good olive oil, pounded garlic, vinegar, and the right amount of salt. That is it. 

    The more ambitious—it just takes more time; it's not that difficult. It also requires that you like lobster at least a fraction of the amount that I do—which is a good deal. Even though I’ve had it very rarely, I will hasten to add, the lobster roll that has green goddess dressing—which is like an herbal, aioli, avocado dressing—is so delicious. That is one to take on if you are willing to invest a bit more time in the preparation of something. 

    Now, what I was going to ask you—it's not related to food. Looking at the news, how countries dealing best with the pandemic and with social unrest are led by women. Is that something that you thought of? Of course, I hope everyone will have read the book and I’m not spoiling anything.  

    Curtis

    I don't know.  

    Fanny

    The other day, I found this amazing photo of my mom wearing a little badge, she must have been at a Hillary fundraiser—not for president. This must have been eons ago. I posted this to Instagram and thought, if only we had Hillary now. Reading Rodham was like I got to live it for a moment. Then I was like—now I would like the sequel to be her time at the White House where we could sneak into that voyeuristic fantasyland. 

    I wondered if you allowed yourself to ideate into that future. What it looked like. Because, you made her a particularly ethical character. 

    Curtis

    In a way, writing the book gave me a kind of clarity. I knew what I was and was not inventing. Someone said to me recently, what if Biden picks her as VP and I had not heard that that was a possibility. It seems super unlikely to me. Though I would be thrilled; she would have been a wonderful president. She always had much higher ratings when she was holding a job than when she was running for something.

    I think of writing a novel as throwing a dinner party. I have told you that I don’t cook, but in the old days, in my 20s, I would make lasagna. You can be really immersed in the act of preparing it and it is rewarding. Then, by the time everyone else gets there, you just hope there are no hidden disasters. You're kind of sick of it. To read your own book would be like eating a lasagna that you spent all day making. The flavors—you are a little sick of them. 

    Fanny

    That is such a great description. I know from cooking many dinner parties, actually, that there is a fatigue—you have been so exposed to it. I always do this weird performative eating. I’m like, “Everyone, take an enormous spoonful.” It is not because I’m like, “It is so good”; it is more like I need to demonstrate. I don't know what the equivalent will be.  

    I think it is a perceptual experience to the author. The pleasures that you invested in it are the things that are discernable to people. I heavily sympathize. 

    For me, there is an extra potential pitfall of having actually fucked up a recipe that someone is going to DM from Idaho and tell me. I don’t know how it got past three copy editors. 

    Curtis

    Is there a mistake in one of the recipes?

    Fanny

    It has been corrected for, I think, in the second printing. So, I don’t know if it will actually still be around. There is one recipe where I talk about strawberry gelato and how you get a pint of strawberries or a pound—I don’t remember the exact amount—and take two-thirds of it and cook it. Or, like one-third of it. It's a really nice way, actually, with any kind of fruit sorbet or ice cream to coax out flavor because it distills and enhances the flavor and it's especially nice with strawberries. That is the method.

    However, after telling you to cook a certain amount of strawberries, I then neglect to tell you what to do with the rest of the strawberries. It just goes forward. It’s not like, “Take the rest of the strawberries and add them in and then blend it.” This would be, perhaps, more intuitive to a veteran cook who would see that the total number of the pound, they get blended together. But I don’t explicitly say it. You better believe that I got messages about that. People are fastidious readers of recipes. Does that happen to you around any of the things that you’ve written?

    Curtis

    Yes. It is interesting. I think that there is a certain kind of reader who takes delight in finding mistakes. I have a novel that is set in St. Louis where I lived for 11 years. At one point, I referred to a bridge by an incorrect name. Some people weighed in. Some of it is more subjective. One time, I referred to a character belonging to a sorority and someone was like, “She would never have belonged to that sorority, that’s the one you go to if you get really good grades and your mom was in the sorority. That’s not who that character is.” I guess with recipes it is more provable. People say, “This is wrong,” and I am like, “It's fiction, relax.”  

    Fanny

    Actually, did you have any trepidation taking on a character that is so well known? Did you have anxiety about whether Hillary would read it? There are also some spicy sex scenes. From my own experience of writing about my mom, I did some marshaling of what I felt was appropriate to divulge about her. There was no skeleton in the closet that I felt I was keeping back from audiences, but at the same time, I didn't want her to feel exposed in a way. You're dealing with a real person, but a fictional character.

    Curtis

    Unlike your sending a copy to Chelsea—I am not sending a copy of the book to Hillary. I thought about it. 

    What you and I were doing in terms of writing about well-known women—even though you didn't know at the time that you would be moving back into her house upon publication—mine is a well-known woman whom I have never met or will never meet. It's kind of opposite. I don't think an insider DC journalist would write a book like Rodham because they would be worried about burning bridges. As someone who lives in Minneapolis, I do not have political insider bridges to burn. If I had written a love letter to Hillary it would not have been a real novel. I admire her but maybe a handful of people who feel that she is perfect would read it. I think there are a lot of women who feel that she's not perfect but really wanted her to win and identify with her in certain ways. I wish things had been different. I think that this is a book for those readers. This is not for Hillary herself. I think there would have been, I assume, consequences in your life if your mom hated parts of the book. It is almost like my book would not have credibility if there weren’t parts of it that Hillary probably would hate if she read them. Although, I don’t think she’ll read it. 

    Fanny

    I totally know what you mean. Any time you're talking about another person from outside of them there is no way to recount that because you do not have that lived experience. Even though the label on yours is fiction and the label on mine is nonfiction, I think there is a curious melding of the 2 genres that actually gives gravitas to them. It allows you to suspend disbelief. To imagine this Hillary that we know so vividly and also never knew as a girl and also never knew as a president—although we wish.  

    Curtis

    I have never met your mother, never eaten at her restaurant, but, I feel like, “Oh, the time we had that lovely salad together. The time that we were all in France having the leisurely lunch.” This access to someone else's experiences, which I think is one of the reasons that people read. 

    Fanny

    For sure. I’ve jokingly been, like, “My book is the tome of my white privilege. This is a narrative of the extent to which I have benefited from all of the conditions of my upbringing.” At the same time, people, mostly—almost exclusively—told me about how it was nice to travel somewhere else in their mind and to revisit their relationships with their mothers and these kinds of more tender takeaways, which is the least I could hope to provide in this crazy moment. 

    Curtis

    If your book were a novel it would almost not be believable. It would be these charming set pieces. I do think people are hungry for that escapist, pleasurable feeling of socializing with other people, sitting close to them.

    Fanny

    I feel like we have, in a summary, unintentionally created narratives that offer some kind of solace. Not just something to transport and entertain, but also the idea of being able to imagine an alternate reality in which someone with a strong code of ethics and a good brilliant mind was president.

    Curtis

    God, I think so, too. Hopefully, maybe when all of this is finished, you can come to my house and eat boiled hotdogs.  

    [Laughter]

    Fanny

    You know, hotdogs are one of my favorite things, actually. 

    Curtis

    They are pretty tasty. 

    Fanny

    I will not turn my nose up at that.  

    Curtis

    Thank you. This was so delightful. 

    Fanny

    It was so nice to meet you.  

    Curtis

    Congratulations. Take care. Bye.

    Fanny

    Thank you and congratulations to you.