Raymond Carr

Every Friday morning, we have a MailChimp Coffee Hour. Most Fridays, it’s to talk about what’s going on around the office. We started doing this after our company reached 100 employees or so. As you can imagine, a weekly company meeting can get really boring and repetitive.

We hate repetition.

So every once in a while, we invite creative, interesting, thought-provoking, and downright weird people to come and teach us something new. Lots of companies do this. Etsy has their excellent "Code as Craft" talks, and we all know about the Talks at Google. But if there's an ulterior motive to ours, it's to emphasize the importance of creativity, chaos, and loving what you do.

James Victore

James Victore

Artist and author James Victore explained how truth, bravery, and love inspire his work.

Roman Mars

Roman Mars

99% Invisible host Roman Mars performed a live version of his show, answered questions about design and journalism, and regaled us with stories about his kids.

Baratunde Thurston

Baratunde Thurston

Comedian and writer Baratunde Thurston introduced us to his new company, Cultivated Wit, discussed his best-selling book, How to Be Black, and gave us a hilarious behind-the-scenes look at his former employer, The Onion.

Merlin Mann

Merlin Mann

43 Folders creator Merlin Mann talked to us about priorities. "Procrastination is when you forget who you are," he advised. Incidentally, Mann once made a rock opera for MailChimp.

Ann Friedman

Ann Friedman

Journalist and professional .GIF-master Ann Friedman taught us how to properly identify and appreciate haters.

Clark Howard

Clark Howard

Beloved penny-pincher Clark Howard told us about the meandering path that led him to a career in consumer advocacy and answered our questions about homebuying and finding the best airfare deals.

Michael Lopp

Michael Lopp

Writer and engineering manager Michael Lopp inspired us with a talk called "Designers, Programmers, and Dictators."

Hugh Acheson

Hugh Acheson

Restaurateur, author, and Top Chef host Hugh Acheson walked us through his life in food, and reminded us to eat our veggies.

Bruce Schneier

Bruce Schneier

Security technologist and author Bruce Schneier talked to us about trust, cooperative systems, and the abuse of those systems.

Tim Hwang

Tim Hwang

ROFLCon co-founder and Pacific Social Architecting Corporation Chief Scientist Tim Hwang talked to us about using Twitter bots for good—and what happens when a human falls in love with one.

Andrea Seabrook

Andrea Seabrook

Political obsessive and former NPR host Andrea Seabrook challenged and inspired us with her story about why she left the best job in journalism.

Seth Godin

Seth Godin

Entrepreneur and best-selling author Seth Godin talked to us about the importance of being weird.

Austin Kleon

Austin Kleon

Writer (who draws) Austin Kleon showed us his work and explained why becoming a part of a scene is better than working in isolation.

Chip Kidd

Chip Kidd

Friend of superheroes Chip Kidd told us about his life as an author and artist, while wearing a fly blazer.

Zed Shaw

Zed Shaw

Software developer, writer, and musician Zed Shaw taught several of our departments—UX, support, developers, delivery, marketing—how to start coding in Ruby.

Monica Campana

Monica Campana

Living Walls founder Monica Campana showed us how her team is improving the Atlanta community through street art.

Tad Carpenter

Tad Carpenter

Midwest designer and illustrator Tad Carpenter shared some of his favorite projects and talked about what it's like to work with Conan O'Brien.

Chris Rickwood

Chris Rickwood

Award winning video game composer Chris Rickwood made music in front of us. By turning a sound sample from a MailChimp employee into a song, he proved that "the real world sounds badass."

Black Widow

Jeanette Lee, "The Black Widow"

Billiards legend Jeanette Lee, best known as "The Black Widow," described her triumph over scoliosis and showed us some mind-blowing trick shots.

Robocat

Robocat

The software developers of Robocat flew all the way from Denmark to tell us how they raised $300,000 to make a tiny thermometer.